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DI TOLD ME SHE WAS IN DANGER

London Mirror

DIANA confided in a royal biographer that she feared for her life just two months before her death.

Ingrid Seward was told by Diana that she felt her life had been in danger, in a heart-to-heart chat at Kensington Palace.

Ms Seward said: "We were having what she called a girlie chat and she just opened up. She told me exactly what she said in her letter to Burrell.

"She told me: 'I know this sounds silly now, but I did really worry about the brakes on my car'.

"Diana said this to me at the end of June 1997. She was convinced there were people out to get her. We laughed about it. She didn't tell me who they were. She was quite canny.

"She obviously took it quite seriously and said that she had the apartment swept for bugs.

"I spent the morning with her. Everything she told me was amazing. I was under trust not to repeat what she said.

"I couldn't believe what she was saying. It was pretty extraordinary."

Ms Seward, who wrote what Diana told her in an article 12 months ago, added: "Diana avoided saying who these people were who were after her.

"She was trying to emphasise the mistrust she felt for everybody and feeling completely isolated. It must have been pretty scary.

"I knew she was also fearful they would take the boys away from her, and was genuinely worried that would happen.

"She was in turmoil."

Ingrid added: "She always used to say Harry loved being the centre of attention but that William was more complicated.

"He was only 15 when she died and he found it difficult to cope with the interest in her death.

"But Diana said to me in that last interview he would come to terms with all the attention in the end - it was his destiny.

"She was never totally sure of herself, she didn't have the emotional resources to cope with that kind of life.

"If she and Charles had had more time together I think he could have helped her with that, helped her to ignore what was being said in the papers."