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Look at this photograph. The Associated Press describe it as being taken at the same time that Victoria Snelgrove lay dying on the sidewalk. The police officer aiming the weapon is clearly no more than 10-15 feet away from the crowd of people. Firing projectiles euphemistically described as 'non-lethal' from this close range is guaranteed to cause serious injury and likely death.

Police manuals state clearly that such weapons should in no circumstance be fired at this range because at this close proximity you might as well be firing off a round from a 9 millimeter.

Furthermore, the close proximity strongly suggests that the projectile was not just randomly fired into a crowd, but that this was in fact a targeted hit of which Snelgrove, who even the police admit was an innocent bystander, was the victim.

What kind of mentality does it take to shoot an innocent 21-year-old woman in the eye from close range? What has happened to police training over the last decade? Clearly we are the enemy, and the justification has been given to treat us like cattle.

The death of Victoria Snelgrove closes the case on the argument of so-called non-lethal weapons. Their development and media promotion has almost exclusively been geared towards crowd control. This betrays the fact that the government expect there to be more protests and more riots in the coming years. While our right to own a gun in self-defense is questioned at every turn, the government is arming to the teeth in preparation for larger confrontations in the future.

Why is this?

Do they have something planned so horrible that sound wave and microwave weapons will have to be deployed to disperse people from an area and herd them somewhere else?

To the 'rest and relocation center'?

To the paddy wagon?

To the camp?

This was the 'fire' that police were struggling to keep people away from. Hardly of Reichstag proportions is it? The only other photo on the AP/Reuters wire when 'red sox riots' is used as the search parameter shows one individual throwing a smoke bomb.

It's patently clear that tall tales of 'riots' were a ruse to try and justify wildly out of control police brutality.

Another caveat to Snelgrove's death was that the Boston Herald had to publicly apologize for carrying a photo of her body as she lay dying on the sidewalk.

The paper stated, "The Herald today published two graphic photos that angered and upset many in our community. For that, I apologize," Herald Media Inc. Editorial Director Kenneth A. Chandler said in a statement to be published in the paper's Saturday editions. "Our aim was to demonstrate this terrible tragedy as comprehensively as possible. In retrospect, the images of this unusually ugly incident were too graphic."

Take a moment to think about this. Culture in general is more decadent than ever. The general public's blood lust for violence and gore is at record levels and Hollywood is eagerly feeding the addiction. Every new movie tends to trump the last in terms of bloodshed and butchery. Kill Bill, Dawn of the Dead, and Alien vs. Predator are just three recent examples.

In contrast, the public's tolerance for graphic images of real violence is in fact decreasing.

So why are the public hungry for fantasy violence but more afraid than ever to see the real consequences of brutality?

Thirty years ago photos and film footage of crime scenes, murders and the impact of warfare were commonplace in newspapers and on television. Humanity was strong enough to witness the effect of savagery and thus able to embrace and enact moral codes of behaviour and political action to decrease the likelihood of such incidents happening in future.

In today's climate, people in general are so cowardly that they actively shun real-world images of violence, while lusting for fantasy violence, because it reinforces a truth that sits uncomfortably with them. The authorities are not here to 'protect' us, they are here to attack and enslave us. This has been the norm throughout history and there is no reason to believe it isn't happening today.

The denial mechanism kicks in. They don't want to see the photos because it conflicts with their God-given voice of conscience which tells them that this is wrong and they should do something about it.

To avoid that conflict, the individual reverts back to a vulnerable childlike mentality, where the State is the parent and the State can do no wrong. If they can't see it then it doesn't exist. Denial mechanism activated.

Red Sox Fan Death Underlines Distorted Mentality of Both Police and Public

Alex Jones and Paul Joseph Watson | October 24 2004

The tragic and unnecessary death of Victoria Snelgrove did not just provide us with another example of horrific police brutality, it emphasized a cultural shift in attitudes towards violence and reality in general.

Snelgrove was struck in the left eye by a projectile containing pepper spray that was fired by police amid 'riots' in the aftermath of the Red Sox' win over the Yankees on Thursday night.

The only source telling us there were out of control riots were the police themselves. A Reuters/AP photo wire search indicates the opposite, a few idiots throwing Molotov cocktails in one small area and a 'fire' which is no larger and no more dangerous than a box of matches.