Featured Stories World News Commentary Money Watch Multimedia Prison Planet U.S. News Science And Technology

Congressman Calls Vote on $26 Billion Jobs Bill a Sign ‘We’re Not Bankrupting the Country Fast Enough’

  • Print The Alex Jones Channel Alex Jones Show podcast Prison Planet TV Infowars.com Twitter Alex Jones' Facebook Infowars store

Pete Winn
CNS News
Aug 11, 2010

With a tone of sarcasm, a California Republican congressman said that he “knows” why members of the U.S. House of Representatives were summoned from their home districts back to Washington, D.C., and the halls of Congress.
 
“Many people are asking why Congress is here today,” Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.) said on Tuesday. “I think the answer’s pretty simple: We’re not bankrupting the country fast enough and so we need to come back and spend more.”
 
The House, which had adjourned for its August recess, was called back into session by House Democratic leaders to vote on a $26-billion jobs-creation bill, which it approved Tuesday afternoon on a 247-161 vote.
 
During the week that Congress was not in session, McClintock said his constituents had one message: “Stop the spending.”
 
“Obviously, Congress isn’t listening,” McClintock said. “Over the past two years, this administration and this Congress have increased spending by nearly 18 percent and run up more debt in two years than the ‘irresponsible’ Bush administration did in all of its eight years combined.”

Full article here

Having A Supply Of Healthy Foods That Last Just Makes Sense

Congressman Calls Vote on $26 Billion Jobs Bill a Sign ‘We’re Not Bankrupting the Country Fast Enough’  150410banner7

This article was posted: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 at 3:27 am





Infowars.com Videos:

Comment on this article

Comments are closed.

Watch the News

FEATURED VIDEOS
Nanny State to Ban Toasters, Kettles & Hair Dryers! See the rest on the Alex Jones YouTube channel.

Obama Bypassing Congress to Sign UN Climate Change Deal See the rest on the Alex Jones YouTube channel.

© 2013 PrisonPlanet.com is a Free Speech Systems, LLC company. All rights reserved. Digital Millennium Copyright Act Notice.