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Montana GOP Rep.: “Pay Me In Gold Before Dollars Have No Value”

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Zero Hedge
November 26, 2012

Jerry O’Neil, six-term GOP state representative in Montana, has asked to receive his salary (which at $10.33 per hour is around $1800 per month) in gold or silver. The long-standing legislator was driven to this decision by his constituents’ concerns about the nation’s massive debt-load and fears of our country’s collapse as “only so many dollars can be printed before they have no value.”The long-time Ron Paul supporter, according to Time, cited Article 1, Section 10 of the US Constitution, which says, in part, that “No State shall… make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts.” State administrators have denied his request and added that “a bill could be introduced to accomplish this result.” O’Neil, like many other, believes “The Keynesian era of financing government with debt appears to be close to its demise.”

From O’Neil’s Letter (via HuffPo):

It is very likely the bottom will fall out from under the U.S. dollar. Only so many dollars can be printed before they have no value. The Keynesian era of financing government with debt appears to be close to its demise.

If and when that happens, how can we in the Montana Legislature protect our constituents? — The only answer I can come up with is to honor my oath to the U.S. Constitution and request that your debt to me be paid in gold and silver coins that will still have value when the U.S. dollar is reduced to junk status. I therefore request my legislative pay to be in gold and silver coins that are unadulterated with base metals.

Via Time:

A GOP state representative in Montana who asked to receive his salary in gold and silver coins has been rebuffed by the state’s Office of Legislative Services. Rep. Jerry O’Neil, who hails from the small town of Columbia Falls in the northwest corner of the state, sent a letter earlier this month requesting that his salary from here on in be paid in coins.

Given the state of the U.S. economy and the massive national debt, O’Neil reportedlyworried that America’s paper currency could be on the brink of collapse“Only so many dollars can be printed before they have no value,” he explained to the localDaily Inter Lake newspaper. According to USA Today, O’Neil is a longtime supporter of Ron Paul, the former Texas congressman and perennial presidential candidate who advocates a return to the gold standard.

However, it was O’Neil’s constituents who led him to consider requesting his salary in coins.  O’Neil has never before raised the subject of how he should be paid during his six terms as state representative for Montana’s Flathead Valley. “My constituents, when I went door to door, one of the things they were interested in was the $17 trillion national debt,” he explained to the Huffington Post. “Some of my constituents said we would not have this problem if we had currency backed by gold.”

Making his case to the Daily Inter Lake, O’Neil cited Article I, Section 10 of the U.S. Constution, which says, in part, that “No State shall… make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts.”

“How can we in the Montana Legislature protect our constituents?” O’Neil asked in his letter to the Office of Legislative Services.

Montana state legislators are paid $10.33 per hour while the legislature is in session; O’Neil estimated his salary to be about $1,800 a month, close to the market value of one 2012 American Eagle One Ounce Gold Proof Coin, according to Politico.

Sheryl Olson, the deputy director of the Montana Department of Administration, told the Huffington Post that state employees are paid either by a state warrant of payment (basically, a check) or via direct deposit. To her knowledge, O’Neil is the only government worker to have requested payment in gold coin, she said.

Montana legislative attorney Jaret Coles responded to O’Neil’s letter last week, informing him that neither the U.S. Constitution nor Montana state law requires an agency to pay its debts with gold and silver, according to the Flathead Beacon. Coles explained in his letter that if a member of the legislature wishes to be paid in gold or silver “a bill could be introduced to accomplish this result,” reports Politico.

O’Neil has decided not to follow through on this advice and is looking into other options.

This article was posted: Monday, November 26, 2012 at 5:57 am





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