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National Review Critiques Alex Jones as Fire-and-brimstone Preacher

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Kurt Nimmo
Prison Planet.com
April 30, 2013

National Review Critiques Alex Jones as Fire and brimstone Preacher  joneshorn

Photo: Dan Winters

Alex Jones is a vexing problem for the neocon and liberal factions of the establishment. They can no longer deny his influence enjoys an exponential growth curve. Liberals have tried in vain to undermine Alex’s political influence by either lampooning him or dismissing him as an addlepated conspiracy loon. This approach usually draws more people to his websites and radio and television shows instead of sending them away.

The neocons over at the National Review Online have devised a different approach. Instead of portraying Jones as a dangerous right-wing fanatic (a tactic favored by the Southern Poverty Law Center), the neocons have decided to depict Jones as analogous to a fire-breathing and bible-thumping Southern preacher.

“There are two forces in Jones’s world,” writes Betsy Woodruff, a William F. Buckley Fellow at the National Review Institute. “The battle for souls is between the corrosive forces of the New World Order (who have infiltrated everything from the Obama and Bush White Houses to MTV) and the indefatigable human will. Jones is a latter-day gnostic. He wants his audience to wake up from their sleep, emerge from their Platonic cave, and see the world as it truly is. That’s the conversion moment. The next step is walking with Alex Jones in the new life of the spirit.”

“We should credit Jones’s success to his status as the ultimate street preacher,” Woodruff continues. “In the town square of cyberspace, he’s the sign-waving, Bible-beating, sackcloth-and-ashes-sporting prophet of end times that you just can’t ignore.”

For the establishment intelligentsia on both side of the false left-right paradigm virtually nothing is more derisive than characterizing opponents as religious fanatics. For the neocons, this is a common practice. They have consistently portrayed Muslims as wild-eyed fanatics and Islam as a violent religion. Ms. Woodruff has adapted this field tested technique in an effort to minimize the impact of Jones and his followers and reduce his message to mere theological proselytization.

Ms. Woodruff, however, is preaching to the neocon choir. Beyond the constrained realm of Bill Buckley acolytes and neocon grandstanders for the Israeli-centric vision of the known universe, Jones’ message makes certain and undeniable sense. It really does not take a rocket scientist – or an American Enterprise Institute fellow – to see that a cabal of international bankers, transnational corporations and one-world globalists are taking America down the garden path to destruction. Despite the National Review allusion that Alex Jones is selling snake oil to the gullible masses, millions of people find credence in his critique and reassurance in his scorching criticism of the global elite.

According to a poll conducted by Public Policy Polling earlier this month, nearly one-third of Americans believe a secretive power elite is conspiring to rule the world and install an authoritarian global government. The establishment media desperately labors to obfuscate this fact. But as the economy worsens, public confidence in corrupt officialdom and government plummets, and the wars continue to roll on with tragic consequence, more and more Americans arrive at the conclusion that things are not as they seem – or as the elite and the establishment intelligentsia insist they are.

It is fair to say that the order to characterize Jones and Infowars as a fringe religious movement came right from the CIA. It is common knowledge that Buckley and his National Review were connected to the CIA, a fact confirmed by the late publisher’s son, Christopher. The younger Buckley’s book, Losing Mum and Pup: A Memoir, is “quite interesting in that it ties a string between Buckley and the CIA, after Buckley was already involved with National Review,” notes Economic Policy Journal.

For an in-depth look at Buckley, the National Review, the CIA and the attack on libertarianism, see Richard Cummings’ Swine Before Perle — ‘The National Review’ Attack on LRC.

This article was posted: Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 1:37 pm





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